Binational pact aims to keep industrial plants in border region

Binational Pact

Brownsville officials were among Rio Grande Valley economic development leaders who signed a bi-national collaboration agreement on March 5 between South Texas and the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, aimed at boosting economies on both sides of the border.

The initiative was led by the Rio South Texas Economic Council and the Ministry of Economic Development of the state government of Tamaulipas, with the signing ceremony in Weslaco. Besides officials from Brownsville, also participating were economic development leaders from Alamo, Donna, Edinburg, Harlingen, Hidalgo, Laredo, McAllen, Mission, Palmview, Pharr, Roma, Rio Grande City, San Benito, Sullivan City and Weslaco.

From the Mexican side, in addition to Matamoros, were leaders from Altamira, Camargo, Ciudad Victoria, Diaz Ordaz, Guerrero, Madero, Mier, Miguel Aleman, Nuevo Laredo, Reynosa, Rio Bravo, Tampico and Valle Hermoso.

According to RSTEC, the agreement is intended to strengthen investment recruitment and job creation in communities north and south of the Rio Grande.

Mario Lozoya, executive director of the Greater Brownsville Incentives Corporation and one of the agreement's signatories, said the agreement was forged partly in response to a situation with U.S.-owned maquiladoras (industrial plants) in Matamoros that has prompted some of them to relocate to the United States or Mexico's interior.

A mandate from Mexico's new president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, doubling the minimum wage along a narrow strip of the country's northern border, led to a dispute between labor unions demanding higher wages for employees making above minimum wage and "maquila" management, who refuse to raise wages, arguing that their employees were already making the wages Obrador sought to bring about.

Another piece of Obrador's northern-border program entailed slashing the value-added tax on maquilas in the border region so they could afford the wage increase. At any rate, tens of thousands of maquila workers have walked off the job in Matamoros.

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In Blow to Trump, America’s Trade Deficit in Goods Hits Record $891 Billion

America’s Trade Deficit

WASHINGTON — America’s trade deficit in goods with the rest of the world rose to its highest level in history last year as the United States imported a record number of products, including from China, widening the deficit to $891.3 billion and delivering a setback to President Trump’s goal of narrowing that gap.

The increase was driven by some factors outside Mr. Trump’s control, like a global economic slowdown and the relative strength of the United States dollar, both of which weakened overseas demand for American goods. But the widening gap was also exacerbated by Mr. Trump’s $1.5 trillion tax cut, which has been largely financed by government borrowing, and the trade war he escalated last year.

It is a case of textbook economics catching up with some of Mr. Trump’s unorthodox economic policies. Economists have long warned that Mr. Trump’s tax cuts would ultimately exacerbate a trade deficit he has vowed to reduce, as Americans, flush with extra cash, bought more imported goods.

His trade war with Beijing also widened the gap: Stiff tariffs on Chinese goods helped slow China’s economy, crimping American exports, which declined nearly 50 percent in December from the same month a year before.

"All countries run trade deficits whenever they consume more than they produce,” said Kimberly Clausing, an economist at Reed College in Oregon. “And when we borrow to finance tax cuts, like we did with the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, we make these imbalances worse."

The trade deficit is the difference between how much a country sells to its trading partners and how much it buys. It generally includes both goods and services, though Mr. Trump has focused almost exclusively on the deficit in goods. He has long boasted that his trade policies would reduce that gap, which he views as a measure of whether partners like China and the European Union are taking advantage of the United States, a diagnosis few economists share.

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