Chick-fil-A and Starbucks Distributor to Move California Headquarters to Texas

Distributor to Move California Headquarters to Texas

A distributor to move its corporate headquarters to Texas from California to centralize its operations. The organization is a distributor to major restaurant chains such as Chick-fil-A, Chipotle and Starbucks.

Quality Custom Distribution is a part of Golden State Foods, and a global supplier to the quick-service restaurant and retail industries. The organization is leasing 10,784 square feet of office space at 2801 Network Blvd. in Frisco, Texas. Frisco is 27 miles north of downtown Dallas, for its headquarters. It sets the new office to open in January 2020.

The company expects some employees to move from California to Texas with the corporate headquarters. Also, they have plans to "provide a variety of new jobs," at the Dallas-area office.

The company has already begun posting job openings in Frisco, which include finance, accounting, customer service and purchasing positions. Quality Custom Distribution has 17 active job postings on online job websites. Officials were not immediately available to comment beyond a statement.

The move from Irvine, California, helps centralize the company's corporate operations. It better aligns and supports its distribution center market and its customers, said Ryan Hammer, corporate vice president and president of Golden State Foods Logistics.

The distributor to move from California Headquarters to Texas will grow its distribution network and secure its position as a main player in the food industry. The Dallas-area's central location, large talent pool, and business-friendly community fed into the decision to move to the North Texas region said, Hammer.

The company's distribution network includes two centers in Texas, one in the Dallas area and another in San Antonio. The Dallas-area location sits in Lancaster at 3900 N. Dallas Ave., which is 14 miles south of downtown Dallas. According to CoStar data, Quality Custom Distribution leases about 55,000 square feet of industrial space in the building.

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Warehouse or store? Picking the wrong place to unpack can cost you

warehouse or store

Retailers can see "considerable savings" if they unpack case packs (packages shipped by the supplier) into the individual consumer units at a distribution center before shipping the product to the final store, according to a 2017 paper published in the European Journal of Operations Research that focused on grocery retailers in the Netherlands and Germany. The amount of savings will vary depending on the SKU, and they are even greater if a model is used to determine the "optimal solution" for a given retailer.

The paper examined two different scenarios for a given SKU:

  1. Stores are sent case packs of the SKU and unload them onsite.
  2. Store are sent a custom number of consumer-level packaging units based on their inventory needs.

The researchers developed a model to determine the best unpacking location for a given SKU. This was then tested in a "hypothetical environment" that used data from a European retailer (referred to as Delta in the study), information on its current operations practice and cost data from a second retailer. When the researchers tested their model in the hypothetical environment, they found a 5.3% drop in the overall cost when the retailer moved from its current operating model to what the paper referred to as the "optimal solution."

The optimal solution in this paper was a model in which all stores follow the same unpacking method for a given product (either delivering case packs to the store or unpacking it into consumer units at the distribution center) depending on what is the lowest cost for all stores. Retailers must determine the lowest cost option for each product.

Marginally more cost savings were seen if each store used the unpacking method that reduced its individual cost (as opposed to the cost to the entire retailer) but this can be especially hard to put in place at the distribution center level, Rob Broekmeulen, the paper's author and assistant professor at the Eindhoven University of Technology, told Supply Chain Dive in an interview.

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