Trump signs revised trade deal with Mexico, Canada but shuts Democrats out of celebration

USMCA signing

WASHINGTON – Still facing a divisive impeachment trial in the Senate, President Donald Trump celebrated a rare bipartisan achievement Wednesday when he signed into law a revamped trade deal with Mexico and Canada.

Surrounded by business leaders wearing hard hats, Trump portrayed the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA, as "a colossal victory" for American farmers, manufacturers and other workers.

"For the first time in American history, we have replaced a disastrous trade deal that rewarded outsourcing with a truly fair and reciprocal trade deal that will keep jobs, wealth and growth right here in America," Trump said during a signing ceremony on the White House South Lawn.

Trump gave a shout-out to more than two dozen Republican lawmakers whom he credited with helping push the deal through Congress.

Left off of his list of plaudits and missing from the celebration: Congressional Democrats, who put their own stamp on the agreement and whose support was pivotal to helping it secure congressional approval. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office said no Democrats were invited to the ceremony.

The revised trade deal, one of Trump's top legislative priorities, is the product of months of negotiations and replaces the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, which essentially eliminated tariffs on most goods traded among the three countries.

The agreement guarantees U.S. farmers greater access to Canada's agriculture market and puts new e-commerce rules in place. It also dictates that a higher percentage of autos be made from parts manufactured in North America and requires that at least 40% of vehicle production be done by workers earning at least $16 per hour.

In addition, the pact, which is supported by labor unions and business groups, includes stronger provisions on labor, enforcement and pharmaceuticals that Democrats had sought as a condition for their approval of the agreement.

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Texas No. 1 in foreign trade during third quarter

foreign trade

Texas continues to be a leader in international trade, ranking No. 1 in exports of manufactured and non-manufactured commodities for the third quarter, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Year-to-date, Texas has exported an estimated $155.8 billion in manufactured goods and $68.7 billion in non-manufactured commodities, ranking it No. 1 in both categories among U.S. states.

The four top states for exports of manufactured goods year-to-date after Texas are California at an estimated $93.7 billion; Michigan, $39 billion; Illinois, $38.8 billion; and Ohio, $35.5 billion, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's Exports by Metropolitan Area Report released on Dec. 19.

Mexico was the top destination for exports from Texas at $109.7 billion in 2018, representing 35% of the state's total goods exported, according to the census bureau report as well as data from the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. Canada was second at $27.5 billion.

Texas has accounted for 16.5% of U.S. exports of manufactured and 34.9% of non-manufactured goods so far this year, according to the bureau's report.

The top manufactured commodities exported by Texas include crude oil and petroleum, propane, liquified natural gas and parts/accessories for automatic data processing machines. The top non-manufactured goods produced in Texas include cattle (beef), cotton, chickens, greenhouse and nursery products and dairy products.

The top imports for Texas during the third quarter were crude oil, computers, car engines, cars and car parts and cell phones.

Houston was the top U.S. metro area in terms of exports in the third quarter at $31.3 billion, according to the study. Houston's economy is closely tied to the energy industry, particularly oil and liquefied natural gas.

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